Snoring And Apnoea Blog

Why Poor Sleep Can Make You Gain Weight

Posted on Wed, Apr 17, 2019

abdomens-1432560-websmall.jpgminIf you’re like most people, you probably get around 6-8 hours sleep a night. What you might not know is that sleeping for less than 9 hours could be contributing to weight gain. Not only that but, if you suffer from sleep apnoea your chances of gaining weight are even higher.

Sleep Duration & Weight Gain

A new study analysing sleep effects on health has found that people in the study, who were sleeping for 6 hours each night had waist measurements of 3 cm wider than those who are getting 9 hours of sleep.

The research, led by Laura Hardie of the Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine and the School of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Leeds, involved 1,615 people aged 19-65 in Great Britain. Laura and her team studied the relationship between sleep duration and a number of quantifiable factors such as waist circumference, blood pressure, lipids, glucose, thyroid hormones and other measures of a person's metabolic profile.

"Because we found that adults who reported sleeping less than their peers were more likely to be overweight or obese. Our findings highlight the importance of getting enough sleep," Hardie told ScienceDaily.com.

"How much sleep we need differs between people," she added, "but the current consensus is that seven to nine hours is best for most adults."

In fact, the findings of this new study show that waist circumference and BMI are lowest for people who get 12 hours sleep a night! This finding contradicts earlier studies that have shown too much sleep might have a similar impact on the body as too little sleep.

Obstructive Sleep Apnoea And Weight Gain

Another new study has revealed the vicious cycle of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and weight gain. It’s a well-known fact that obesity is a leading risk factor for OSA, but a new study has revealed that OSA itself may promote further weight gain.

Ari Shechter, a Professor in the Department of Medicine at Columbia University, recently published his findings in the journal Sleep Medicine Reviews. Shechter’s findings suggest that OSA severity is linked to unhealthy dietary choices. Food preference was studied in a group of patients undergoing screening for OSA. They analysed the fibre and fat intake in the morning following the diagnostic study.

The evidence suggests that leptin levels are abnormally high in those with OSA, similar to the leptin levels seen in obesity. This may also contribute to a “leptin resistance” in OSA patients.

Leptin, also known as the ‘starvation hormone’ notifies your brain if you have eaten enough. It also notifies you if your calorie intake is sufficient. An abnormally high leptin can cause a resistance, resulting in low satiety and high hunger. Which leads to excess food intake and weight gain.

Shechter’s research validates the reciprocal relationship between sleep disorders and weight gain. But we all know how difficult it can be to get 6-8 hours sleep, let alone 9-12. Even if you don’t have OSA, getting enough sleep is vital to achieving your health and weight goals. Here are 9 things you can do today to get a better night’s sleep.

If you (or someone you know) suffers from snoring or sleep apnea, contact us now on 1300 246 637 (or by sending a confidential email using the form below) for an obligation-free chat with one of our friendly Sleep Therapists. Snoring and sleep apnea should be treated; not tolerated.

We're here to help.  Contact us now.

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Tags: weight gain, sleep apnoea and weight

Belly Fat Linked To Sleep Disorders

Posted on Wed, Nov 07, 2012

Numerous studies have found poor quality sleep leads to overeating and physiological changes that lead to heart disease, obesity, depression and Type 2 diabetes.  The ‘tricky’ part is that inadequate sleep actually disrupts the body’s balance and stimulates the appetite ... which leads to greater weight gain and consequently greater risks.  The good news is that the latest studies suggest a two way relationship between sleep disorders and weight gain – meaning improved sleep can help you lose weight, and losing weight can help you sleep better.

Independent scientific studies have consistently founds that sleep disorders are clearly linked to obesity and heavier individuals tend to report more problems getting a good night’s sleep.

Now, in a new study just released by researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. It has been reported that weight loss, either through diet or a combination of diet and exercise, can lead to better sleep.

The researchers followed 77 overweight or obese individuals with type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes over a 6 month period. At the start and end of the study, the participants completed surveys detailing their sleep problems such as sleep apn0ea, fatigue, insomnia, restless sleep, excessive sleep and use of sedatives.   Each participant’s body mass index (BMI) was also recorded so weight changes could be tracked.

The participants were then separated into two groups. The first group went on a weight-loss diet with exercise training and the second group simply stuck to a diet program.

At the end of the six months, both groups experienced a weight loss of about 15 pounds on average and a 15% reduction in belly fat. The researchers also authors found both groups had improved their sleep quality by about 20%.

“The key ingredient for improved sleep quality from our study was a reduction in overall body fat, and, in particular belly fat, which was true no matter the age or gender of the participants or whether the weight loss came from diet alone or diet plus exercise,” said study author Kerry Stewart, a professor of medicine at John Hopkins in a statement.

According to Stewart, belly fat is particularly concerning since it can be metabolically detrimental to health. “Belly fat is almost like a living organ. It produces proteins that cause inflammation,” says Stewart. “When you lose a lot of belly fat in particular, the level of those substances go way down and the inflammatory response is much less than it was before.”

"That means that rates of heart disease may decline as belly fat dissolves. Inflammation aggravates blood vessels, which can increase heart disease risk, and also  interfere more generally with the body’s normal physiological processes. The end result is obesity, and obesity in turn puts added mechanical pressure on the heart and lungs. “If you have a lot of belly fat, the lungs can’t expand as well, so it becomes harder to breathe when you’re sleeping, which is why more people get sleep apnoea,” says Stewart. “When you have sleep apnoea, you wake up more in the middle of the night and that leads to daytime sleepiness and fatigue. So people are feeling miserable because they haven’t had a good nights sleep.”

Shedding extra weight and increasing physical activity triggers a drop in inflammation, lowers insulin resistance and improves metabolism. “This can foster weight loss or prevent further weight gain,” says Stewart.

Whether sleep disorders cause obesity, or obesity causes sleep disorders isn’t clear, although it’s likely  both processes are at work simultaneously. “We are not exactly sure where the problem starts, but we think it is a vicious cycle. Regardless of where it starts, they feed off each other,” says Stewart.

If you are struggling to lose weight, it may be that an underlying sleep disorder like sleep apnoea is part of the problem.  If you are overweight, snoring, waking tired, and feeling sleepy through the day it is almost certain that you have an underlying sleep disordered breathing (SDB) condition.  Treatment of the SDB can help re-start the metabolism and reduce the risks associated with obesity.

If you think you have some sort of sleep disorder, give us a call on 1300 246 637 to talk things over with a friendly sleep therapist ... or request a sleep study online by clicking the button below.

 

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Tags: apnoea, sleep disorders, weight gain, obesity, belly fat

Poor Sleep Equals Weight Gain

Posted on Mon, May 14, 2012

 

According to new research, published in the 'Sleep' medical journal, has found people who sleep longer and/or better have a lower incidence of excess fat and high BMI. 

A surprising finding is that rhe study says those who get lots of sleep -- meaning around nine hours a night -- are less likely to put on weight, even if they have the genes that predispose them to weight gain.

Previous research has also shown that sleep deprivation can play havoc with our hunger hormones, decreasing the levels of those hormones that make us feel full.

While it's unlikely that we can sleep our way to weight loss, getting more sleep might allow us to control our eating and to do more exercise -- two things that we know do lead to a healthy weight.

 

Tags: sleep, weight gain, bmi

Snoring Leads To Weight Gain

Posted on Tue, Jul 05, 2011

Overweight people are known to be more likely to suffer from a sleep disordered breathing (SDB) condition because of the build up of fatty deposits in the soft tissue of the tongue, soft palate and pharyngeal walls.  The enlarged tissues encroach on the upper airway, causing restriction or blockages. 

But it is NOT just a matter of ‘Fat people snore.”  More and more research is pointing to the fact that “Snoring people get fat.”

 Worse still, there is clear evidence that sleep disordered breathing is a significant contributor to hypertension (high blood pressure) and type 2 diabetes.

In one extremely well written paper, by Dr Ralph Pascualy of the Swedish Sleep Medicine Institute, the link between the conditions is explained thus:

 “…several clear relationships have been shown between sleep deprivation and metabolic abnormalities.  Sleep debt strongly affects glucose utilization as well as circadian cycles of thyrotropin, cortisol, growth hormone, and other physiological variables.   

Sleep debt alone is reported to result in impaired glucose effectiveness similar to that found in non-insulin-dependent diabetics.  Severe OSA significantly influences plasma insulin and glycemia and may increase the risk of diabetes independently of obesity. Not all OSA patients are obese; however, insulin resistance is found in both obese and non-obese OSA patients. Blood pressure and fasting insulin correlate closely with both BMI and the severity of OSA. Thus, both the sleep debt and the sympathetic activation that accompany OSA may speed the deterioration of glucose tolerance. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia lead to further sympathetic activation, thus completing the circle of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and the related metabolic abnormalities.”

In simple terms:  sleep disordered breathing leads to reduced blood oxygen levels and increased blood pressure.  As a result, the body’s metabolism is retarded – which makes it easier to gain weight, and harder to lose it.

Failure to treat a sleep disordered breathing condition puts a sufferer on a downward spiral — because the SDB leads to weight gain, which makes the SDB worse, which makes the weight gain worse … and so on. 

The full article is available in the ‘Research’ section of this website.

Tags: snoring, OSA, weight gain

Snoring Causes Weight Gain

Posted on Thu, May 19, 2011

Overweight people are known to be more likely to suffer from a sleep disordered breathing (SDB) condition because of the build up of fatty deposits in the soft tissue of the tongue, soft palate and pharyngeal walls.  The enlarged tissues encroach on the upper airway, causing restriction or blockages. 

But it is NOT just a matter of ‘Fat people snore.”  More and more research is pointing to the fact that “Snoring people get fat.”

Worse still, there is clear evidence that sleep disordered breathing is a significant contributor to hypertension (high blood pressure) and type 2 diabetes.

In one extremely well written paper, by Dr Ralph Pascualy of the Swedish Sleep Medicine Institute, the link between the conditions is explained thus:

 “…several clear relationships have been shown between sleep deprivation and metabolic abnormalities.  Sleep debt strongly affects glucose utilization as well as circadian cycles of thyrotropin, cortisol, growth hormone, and other physiological variables.   

Sleep debt alone is reported to result in impaired glucose effectiveness similar to that found in non-insulin-dependent diabetics.  Severe OSA significantly influences plasma insulin and glycemia and may increase the risk of diabetes independently of obesity. Not all OSA patients are obese; however, insulin resistance is found in both obese and non-obese OSA patients. Blood pressure and fasting insulin correlate closely with both BMI and the severity of OSA. Thus, both the sleep debt and the sympathetic activation that accompany OSA may speed the deterioration of glucose tolerance. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia lead to further sympathetic activation, thus completing the circle of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and the related metabolic abnormalities.”

In simple terms:  sleep disordered breathing leads to reduced blood oxygen levels and increased blood pressure.  As a result, the body’s metabolism is retarded – which makes it easier to gain weight, and harder to lose it.

Failure to treat a sleep disordered breathing condition puts a sufferer on a downward spiral — because the SDB leads to weight gain, which makes the SDB worse, which makes the weight gain worse, which makes the SDB worse … and so on. 

The full article is available in the ‘Research’ section of The Sleep Therapy Clinic website at www.SleepTherapyClinic.com

Tags: snoring, weight gain

Why Is Snoring Linked To Weight Gain?

Posted on Tue, Nov 30, 2010

It’s long been known that overweight people are more likely to suffer from a sleep disordered breathing condition.  This is hardly surprising, as the soft tissue of the tongue, soft palate and pharyngeal walls ‘bulk up’ with fat deposits, thus constricting the upper airway.

But many people are unaware of the fact that it is NOT simply a case of ‘fat people snore’.  In recent medicial research published by Dr Pascualy from the Swedish Medical Institute, a reverse connection was identified.  That is, the researchers pointed out that ‘snoring people get fat’. 

The basis of this finding was the discovery that the lipid metabolism is retarded as soon as sleep disordered breathing commences.  This is a particularly significant finding because it shows why snoring and apnoea are ‘slippery slope’ conditions which can often lead to a negative spiral. 

Specifically, the patient begins to snore or suffer from apnoeic events.  The body’s metabolism is retarded as a result, making it harder to lose weight and easier to gain weight.  The increased weight leads to ‘bulking up’ of the airway tissues, which leads in turn to increased snoring and apnoea.  The cycle is then repeated, with the patient becoming more and more tired and consequently less likely to exercise and do the things which are needed to re-boot the metabolism.

Such is the importance of this issue, leading nutritionists and dieticians are now telling patients their sleep disordered breathing condition must first be resolved before anything can be done to permanently reduce weight.  It makes sense, obviously.  Dieting with a slow metabolism will always be slow and frustrating, whereas a properly functioning metabolism will ensure rapid and sustainable results are enjoyed.

For more information on this and other health / wellbeing issues related to snoring and sleep apnoea, visit our website at www.SleepTherapyClinic.com

 

Tags: snoring, apnoea, apnea, weight gain